5 Reasons Why Your Monologue Isn’t Working

If you are reading this it is probably because you feel your monologue hasn’t been working.  Maybe you aren’t exactly sure why that is.

There are many reasons why your monologue may not be working in the audition room.

We’ve narrowed it down to 5 common reasons why you may be experiencing issues with your current monologue.

Why Your Monologue Isn’t Working:

1. Overdone 

You have done your monologue so many times that it has become overdone.

Working with the material for so long has reached the point of a much needed break from it.  That’s fine.

Finding new monologue challenges with fresh material is the best thing you can do.

Over time, you can always go back to your original monologue and begin work on it anew.

2. Confusion

Your monologue confuses you in some way.

Perhaps you don’t really fully understand the nuances within the scene, the character’s conflict or the relationships seem off.

It can even be something not as intellectual but in your gut that simply doesn’t feel right to you.  Trust in that.

You can wrestle with the challenge of working through it or you can move forward with a different monologue you feel more connected with.

3. Rush

Maybe you were in a rush to have a monologue for an audition and picked one quickly and randomly.

Bad idea.

You need to always set time aside to finding a good monologue that you feel you can put the necessary time to commit to bringing it to life.

There are no short cuts in acting.

Take your time finding a monologue.  Don’t rush it.  Have a few prepared ahead of time so when your next monologue audition comes your way, you are ready to go.Searching for the Right Monologue

4. Stubborn

Maybe you hate the monologue and your pride doesn’t want you to chuck it to find something else.

In cases like that you really need to dig deep and think about whether or not you want to battle material in such a way within yourself.

Some acting challenges are worth the fight and others can only cause aggravation.  In moments of aggravation, if you feel like you are forcing yourself to work on a monologue, it’s probably a sig that you need to let it go.

You want to find a monologue that excites you, that helps you create possibilities with your imagination.  You want something that compels you to invest time into your character and experience.

5. You Wrote It

In some situations, a monologue you may have written may psyche you out.  Something about the material you wrote is maybe so personal that it’s getting in the way of your expression.

There are other times when you write a monologue and it flows.  There is no problems whatsoever.

But if a monologue you wrote isn’t working for you, it can mean that the writing could be off key or maybe it’s to close to home for you.

If you are encountering such a problem, it might be better to work on monologues from other writers and playwrights.

Final Thoughts

There can be a ton of different reasons why your monologue isn’t quite working for your needs.

We’ve listed five for you to consider if you happen to be stuck with your current monologue piece.

Overdoing a monologue can lead to becoming stale in your work if you cannot find new ways to make discoveries in the work.

If you aren’t so sure about the context of the monologue scene and you can’t seem to wrap your head around such confusion, it may be best to move on new fresh material.

It’s not a good idea to rush pick a monologue.  Give yourself the time you deserve to find a monologue that connects with you and excites your creativity.

It’s okay to move forward on a different monologue, especially if you don’t like the monologue you are rehearsing.  It’s good to challenge yourself with tough material but if deep down you don’t like the material, why bother using it?

If you have written a monologue and it doesn’t seem right when you perform it at auditions, it could be that you are too close to the material or perhaps you are getting to intellectual about what you wrote.

It is usually best to explore monologues from other writers so you don’t get in your own way.  That’s not to say you can’t write and perform your own monologue.  It’s certainly encouraged.  But if you feel your writer’s cap is getting mixed up with your actor’s cap, it may be wise to separate the two if it’s getting in the way of your creative process.

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