Last Line of Defense

In Last Line of Defense, Mr. Rogers speaks to longtime friend Mrs. Helmsley about her husband Charles granting a building permit for a hotel.

MR. ROGERS:  Your husband wishes to prevent the development of a new hotel. This hotel has been in the works for years and it is finally coming to fruition. However, Charles does not wish to see it through, due to his findings that Mr. Lennington is behind the ordeal. We both know the two of them go back to their rival days in university and it’s simply wrong for Charles to stop this business from taking place. There are quite a few investors involved in this, it will be good for the town, good for employment, but Charles simply refuses. I am one of such investors, Mrs. Helmsley. It is my duty to report this news in my paper, in order to gain public support and help convince your husband of the damage he will do to himself, his reputation. If you can convince him otherwise, to allow the permit to build and to basically step out of harm’s way, well, the board is prepared to provide him with significant compensation….stock and a substantial upfront payment. Do you imagine such a matter can be rectified? Mind you, it isn’t meant to be disrespectful of me to speak to you on his account, but my dear Mrs. Helmsley, I have made numerous attempts and it is to no avail. He is a stubborn man, obdurate in his refusal. There is no reasoning with him. You are my only hope and I’m asking you to understand, and if you may, have a word with him on behalf?

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Last Line of Defense by Joseph ArnoneIn the one act eplay Last Line of Defense, Mr. Rogers visits Mrs. Helmsley in her garden in order to convince her to influence her husband’s desire against a much needed building permit, for a new hotel construction in town. 1 Woman, 2 Men. Drama.

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